Resident Stories

Our residents are at the heart of everything we do. Meet some of the incredible people who make our communities strong.

Nicole – Townview


Nicole knows firsthand that affordable housing is one way people’s lives are made better. As a single mother, getting her degree was no small task and she says living at Townview contributed to her success.


Nicole Bush and her 10-year-old son Oscar live in Rocky Mountain Communities’ Townview apartments on the city’s west side. In December of 2020, Nicole graduated from University of Colorado-Denver with a master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Now, she’s hoping to find a role in local government, explaining that she wants to solve complex problems in the community. 

“I think it’s really interesting that you can use software to provide data to help with policy that makes the built environment better and people’s lives better,” says Nicole. 

Nicole knows firsthand that affordable housing is one way people’s lives are made better. As a single mother, getting her degree was no small task and she says living at Townview contributed to her success. 

“I don’t think I could have done that living anywhere else.”

In addition to affordable rents, Nicole says Townview’s programs make a difference for her and Oscar as well. She uses the food pantry and they’ve participated in events like the community barbeques.

Victor – Meeker Commons


He knows change happens and as it has for most people, the pandemic has brought on difficulties, but he credits his faith with keeping him on solid footing


Victor Torrez, a resident of Meeker Commons, loves to golf in the summer and shoot pool year-round at the senior center. Now though, COVID-19 restrictions have shut down the senior center, which means no pool and no watching Broncos games with
friends.

“I miss being in the main room and sitting in there. Being at home all the time feels like being in jail,” says Torrez. 86 years young, this isn’t the first time in his life that Torrez has weathered changes.
One of nine children and born in Greeley, Torrez left northern Colorado to join the U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division. There, he spent 20 months during the Korean War, jumping out of airplanes for exhibition shows. Discharged in 1957, he returned to
Greeley and went to work at his dad’s construction company.

Interestingly, Torrez spent time at Meeker Commons before he ever moved there. During his time at the family construction company, he operated a backhoe and water truck, removing previous buildings, an old parking lot and trees that occupied where Meeker Commons now sits.

Ken – Garden Terrace


Murphy’s investment in Garden Court runs deep. A few years ago, he and his wife Clorenda sat on a six-person committee which facilitated an event called Culture Fest.


Ken Murphy knows Denver inside and out. In 1952, his parents moved two-year-old Murphy and the family from Wytheville, Virginia to Denver’s Lincoln Park projects on the west side. For
68 years, Murphy has watched the city change and grow.

“It’s evolved into a better city,” says Murphy.

He explains that Denver used to be more segregated, but now he sees a significant difference. Murphy attended Denver East High School, which he says was “one of the most diverse in the state.” And aside from the good weather, he says he loves Denver because of the people and what makes them unique.

In 2000, Murphy moved to Garden Court, the largest of Rocky Mountain Communities’ properties. With 700 residents and situated in the East Colfax neighborhood of Denver, the diversity Murphy appreciates is a cornerstone of the property’s makeup. Murphy says that people representing different cultures in his community is a good thing.

Natasha – Mountain Terrace


As a mother on a fixed income, she loves that RMC plans free events throughout the month


Natasha is a delightful, energetic and friendly seven year old resident at Rocky Mountain Communities who participates in the youth programs. She enjoys the one-on-one and small group homework help during the snack program, as she often needs to adapt her learning style to work with her learning disabilities. But, as soon as homework is done, she loves getting the chance to work alongside the other students in the afterschool program.

While on the younger side of the preschool age group, Natasha’s sister, Katrina, has participated in RISE preschool. Katrina is more comfortable in class, and no longer experiences separation anxiety. She is already starting to associate letters, numbers and colors with items around her house and things she sees throughout the day.

Natasha and Katrina’s mom, Dana, appreciates the social and academic support both of her daughters receive through our programs. As a mother on a fixed income, she loves that RMC plans free events throughout the month for adults as well as families. “This is unlike any other apartment – we love the youth programs, there’s always something fun going on, and we feel like part of a community.”


Renee – Mountain Terrace


Renee recalls how important it has been for her family to have the after school program available for her children


Like other RMC residents, Renee is grateful that she can call Mountain Terrace home for the past few years. At a very young age, Renee was hit by a car and had brain damage, developing a neurological condition. At one point, they thought Renee wasn’t going to be able to walk again, but she was able to regain most of her mobility. However, Renee can’t work full time. Renee works as a cashier at Sweet Tomatoes and her husband, Anthony, works for Kruger warehouse. Without affordable housing rates, Renee and her family wouldn’t be able to afford a place to live.

Renee and Anthony have two daughters, and as their girls, Jalanie and Jeresse, were growing up, they participated in the youth program services at the community. Renee recalls how important it has been for her family to have the after school program available for the children, otherwise she thought they could have made bad decisions.

Currently, Renee and Anthony rely on the food pantry services to make ends meet and they are extremely grateful for the people and the support that this community has offered.


Antoinette – Townview


“RMC has provided me the opportunity to become self-sufficient and break from unhealthy relationships. I can focus on what’s best for my family and don’t have to stay involved in unhealthy relationships just to afford a roof over our heads.”


Antoinette is a single mom that lives with her two sons, eight-year old Sebastian and four-year old Amos. Antoinette moved from Pueblo four years ago looking for better opportunities for her family. When Antoinette first arrived to Denver, she lived for a while in her brother’s basement until she found an apartment she could afford but she felt unsafe and she was determined to find a better home to raise her kids, ideally in a community where her boys could feel safe to go out to the playground.

After moving to an RMC property, Townview in Denver, she felt this would put her family on the right path to accomplish her life goals. As a resident at Townview, Antoinette has access to the food pantry allowing her to provide good snacks and meals for her kids, especially during the summer when her kids are not in school and they don’t have access to the lunch program offered throughout the school year.

Antoinette’s priority is to provide a good environment for her kids and raise good citizens. Antoinette has a part time job as a hairstylist and cleaning homes. “RMC has provided me the opportunity to become self-sufficient and break from unhealthy relationships. I can focus on what’s best for my family and don’t have to stay involved in unhealthy relationships just to afford a roof over our heads.”

Antoinette has set clear long-term goals for her and her family. Since she is able to afford rent and make her payments, she wants to start improving her credit score and saving for a down payment to buy a house.  “I would like to be able to purchase my own home in the future and RMC has been critical in this process.”


Programs

Rocky Mountain Communities is proud to support our residents through a variety of programming. Programs run year round and enhance the lives of  people in our communities.

Community

At Rocky Mountain Communities, building a sense of community and relationship with neighbors is vital. Throughout the summer, staff hosted numerous barbeques and meals, bingo nights and movie nights. Special events were hosted around disaster preparedness, renters insurance, and even a visit from the community officer. Throughout the summer, residents were able to attend the week food pantry at three of our Denver Metro locations where they can receive supplemental food for their families at no cost. At two of our Denver Metro locations, residents have the opportunity to grow fresh produce at on-site community gardens. Residents also received assistance and connection to needed resources such as rent assistance. 

Youth

Over the summer, at Rocky Mountain Communities’ largest community, Garden Court, the Summer Enrichment Program is offered on-site, free-of-cost to resident youth. It’s an opportunity for youth to continue learning throughout the summer to prevent the “summer slide,” and engage in educational activities and guest visits from Denver Zoo, JumpBunch, and more! The program provides the opportunity for parents to continue working throughout the summer and save on typical summer program costs.

Seniors

Throughout the summer months, Rocky Mountain Communities provided an array of programming for residents 55 and older. Programs are centered around aging in place and bringing the services to the residents. Seniors took part in 15 different types of programs such as arts and crafts, games, movie nights, dinners, exercise classes focusing on strengthening muscles to prevent falls, mental jogging to enhance cognitive thinking, and a foot clinic for basic foot maintenance. Also, guest speakers were brought in to discuss insurance, medications, and hospice care information. Lastly, eligible seniors received commodity boxes from the local food bank filled with free food.